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Thread: Sci-Fi Novels

  1. #21
    Pokemon Trainer Student Array Frawg's Avatar
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    @Pokemancer: Ok, so you've read I,Robot too. yeah, the most interesting aspect of that was the reference in the Lije Bailey books to the Psycic Robot.
    Have you ever read anything by Larry Niven?
    0_0 soon.

  2. #22
    Pokemon Trainer Array Pokemancer's Avatar
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    I've read quite a bit of Niven, actually. Man-Kzin Wars, most everything he co-authored with Pournelle (particularly Mote in God's Eye and The Gripping Hand, plus Lucifer's Hammer), a little of Ringworld, but I just never really got into it. I keep meaning to try again, but I've had others ahead of it.

    Speaking of Pournelle, have you ever read the Janissaries books? Greatness!

  3. #23
    Pokemon Trainer Student Array Frawg's Avatar
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    @Pokemancer: No never heard of it. Weren't the Man-Kzin wars authored by someone else? I thought they were just consistent with Niven's Known Space Universe.
    I read through A Mote in God's Eye, but I didn't make it through the Gripping Hand. It just wasn't as good as his other stuff. As far as Ringworld is concerned you have to take the first book with a grain of salt, Once you get to book two it really picks up pace and turns into a great read. What is Janissaries about?
    0_0 soon.

  4. #24
    Pokemon Trainer Array Pokemancer's Avatar
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    Apologies for the large post!

    Man-Kzin: He has written a few portions of it, but overall it's a very well-done series; other authors that wrote in the series: Poul Anderson, SM Stirling, Pournelle, Dean Ing, Greg Bear, Gregory Benford, among others.

     
    The theme of this series is that a small force of principally United States troops, acting as faux mercenaries under a secret CIA contract in Africa during the Cold War, is "rescued" from annihilation by a Cuban military force by extraterrestrial beings (part of an interstellar Confederation) who offer them their lives in exchange for service on a primitive planet in raising a crop of plants that are used in the manufacture of a recreational drug. The primitive planet, called Tran, is populated by other Earth-origin humans who have been periodically and secretly brought there over the past several thousand years of earth history for the same purpose. In the Confederation, humans are used as a soldier/slave class vaguely similar to the Janissary soldiers of the old Ottoman Turkish empire, thus the name of the first novel and the series.

    The series of novels describe how these 20th-Century soldiers proceed to both integrate with the existing human cultures and use them to establish a base of operations for the growing and harvesting of the plant, which only becomes sufficiently potent for use as a drug for a few years out of every 600 earth years. The first book shows how the soldiers use a combination of modern weaponry, knowledge of technology, and advanced military tactics to carve out a political enclave that will enable them to fulfill the rest of their mission, to actually plant and raise the crop they are expected to provide to the extraterrestrials that brought them to this place. The subsequent books illustrate the further adventures of the human soldiers as they perform their mission, but also begin to raise the standard of civilization among the disparate cultures of the humans of Tran. As they learn more of the history of this world, it also becomes clear to them that they will eventually be betrayed by their benefactors, as this has been the fate of each generation of new immigrants in turn. They begin to plan for that betrayal, and other forces outside of Tran begin to plan for what appears to a possible uprising of all humans in the Confederation.


    Also, the Starshield series by Weis and Hickman were quite good, though short-lived and the Star of the Guardians series by Weis was very good!

    Still, the best Sci-Fi I've read in a long while boils down to the Ender's books and Donaldson's Gap Cycle.
    Last edited by Pokemancer; 11-23-2010 at 03:14 PM.

  5. #25
    Crypt Gym Secretary Array pikaluva13's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by laprasman View Post
    that's an easy choice for me, the hunger games by suzanne collins
    yes win
    +10

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  6. #26
    Pokemon Trainer Array Pokemancer's Avatar
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    So what'd you think about Janissaries, Frawg? Read any of those others I mentioned?
    I'll give Ringworld another go next time I'm in the market for a series. Probably with the New Year, I think my schedule will open up some.

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    Putting young whipper snappers into place since 1882. Array belnumcree's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frawg View Post
    Let's try to keep the books in this century. . . JK
    I've never heard of them, except maybe for Webber. Any titles that I might recognize?
    Oops, I misspelled Webers last name, it's one "b".

    Weber is most well known for his Honor Harrington series. (First in series "On Basilisk Station")

    Ringo has written many different series's sp?. Most well known for his Posleen war series. (First in series "A Hymn Before Battle")

    Most of both Honorverse and Posleen War are available as free E-books from Baen Books.
    Extremely ancient and decrepit retired Boulder Gym Leader....Thanks Vis for the new card. *looks at new user title* Stay off my lawn

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  8. #28
    Pokemon Trainer Student Array Frawg's Avatar
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    @Pokemancer: Looks interesting, I'll probably give it a read if I can find it. That being said I have'nt read it yet, and probably won't get around to it until Christmas Break at best.
    0_0 soon.

  9. #29
    Pokemon Trainer Array Pokemancer's Avatar
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    Trust me, I totally understand. My wife and I just beat Fable III, so we're going back to playing Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion, I've got about 6 books that I'm reading, I've got a 12 year old son and a three year old daughter, so time is an extravagance.

  10. #30
    Relic Gym Retiree/Super Moderator Array Dr. Narnad's Avatar
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    Not necessarily a sci-fi spaceship/aliens type of book but Flatland by Edwin A. Abbott is a pretty sweet read. There is a companion/sequel to it called Sphereland that I haven't had the chance to read but is next on my list. The book is a story about a square and his perspective of his 2D world all the while intertwining the social hierarchy of Victorian culture. So you can kill two birds with one stone all the while being entertained.
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